Beaver News

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Beaver New

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4-5-18

3-15-18

Deadline for absentee

ballots is near in school

runoff election on April 3

Voters in Beaver School District who want to have absentee ballots mailed to them for the April 3, 2018, Beaver School Board Runoff Election should apply now. Voters must choose between Brock Russell and Kerry Stafford.s

 

3-12-18

3-1-18

 

Beaver County Junior Livestock Show results

Barrows

Berkshire

Kylen Kamp Champion

Dalton Perry Reserve

Crossbred

Jasmyn Mesa Champion

Kolby Kamp Reserve

Durock

Kylan Kamp Champion Res Grand

Rebecca Freeman Reserve

Hampshire

Ethan Frantz Champion

Reese Porter Reserve

Poland

Kylan Kamp Champion

Spot

Kolby Kamp Champion

Camdyn Bennett Reserve

Yorkshire

Jasmyn Mesa Champion Grand

Skyler Perry Reserve

Beef

Intl Showman

Gavin Sager 1

Kendall Frantz 2 Jr Showman

Kelby Sager1

Kodie Fleming 2

Gavin Sager Supreme

Beef

Sr Showman

Sid Slatten 1

Britney Woodbury 2

Ewe

Mary Morrison Champion Res Grand

Camdyn Kolbe Reserve

Dorset Ewe

Simon Regnier-Nelson Champion

Dannie Regnier-Nelson Dorset Ewe Reserve

Paige Halpain Champion

Hampshire

Camdyn Kolbe Champion Grand

Southdown Ewe

Simon Regnier-Nelson Champion

Suffolk Ewe

Camdyn Kolbe Champion

Gilt

Jasmyn Messa Champion Res Grand

Commercial Gilt

Sid Slatten Reserve

Duroc Gilt

Aspen Freeman Champion Grand

Rebecca Freeman Reserve

Spot Gilt

Jasmyn Mesa Champion

County bred goat

Kodie Fleming Champion

Doe Goat

Kodie Fleming Champion Grand

Tel DeWitt Reserve Res Grand

Jr Showman Goat

Kodie Fleming 1

Rebecca Freeman 2

Kodie Fleming Supreme

Sr Goat Showman

Katelyn Estrada 1

Wether Goat

Kodie Fleming Champion Grand

Kodie Fleming Reserve Res Grand

Angus Heifer

Johnathan Regnier-Nelson Champion

Commercial

Payton Freeman Champion

Tel DeWitt Reserve

Maintainer Heifer

Kelby Sager Champion Grand

P Herford

Hallie Littau Champion Res Grand

Hallie Littau Reserve

Shorthorn Heifer

Logen Freeman Champion

County Bred Lamb

Camdyn Kolbe Champion

Commercial Market Lamb

Camdyn Kolbe Champion

Avery Harrison Reserve

Hamp

Camdyn Kolbe Champion Grand

Angela Pell Reserve

Natural

Dannie Regnier-Nelson Champion

Shropshire

Mary Morrison Champion Simon Regnier-Nelson Reserve

Southdown

Dannie Regnier-Nelson Champion

Suffolk

Camdyn Kolbe Champion Res Grand

Continental Prospect

Kodie Fleming Champion Res Grand

Crossbred Prospect

Gavin Sager Champion Grand

Adam Creason Reserve

English Prospect

Sid Slatten Champion

Kendall Frantz Reserve

Intel Sheep showman

Avery Harrison 1

Jr Sheep Showman

Angela Pell 1

Simon Regnier-Nelson 2

Avery Harrison Supreme

Sr Showman

Dannie Regnier-Nelson 1

Mary Morrison 2

Paige Halpain Sr Showman

Angus Steer

Kelby Sager Champion

Charolais

Adam Creason Champion

Tel DeWitt Reserve

Chianina

Gavin Sager Champion

Wyatt Jett Reserve

County Bred steer

Sid Slatten Champion

Crossbred

Peyton Freeman Champion

Emelie Trentham Reserve

Hereford

Sid Slatten Champion Res Grand

Maine

Kendall Frantz Champion Grand

Shorthorn

Britney Woodbury Champion

Simmental

Wyatt Jett Champion

Sid Slatten Reserve

County Bred Swine

Jasmyn Mesa Champion

Imt Swine Showman

Landri Bennett 1

Devyn Porter 2

Jr Showman

Aspen Freeman 1

Camdyn Bennett 2

Supreme Swine Showman

Landri Bennett Supreme

Sr Swine Showman

Skyler Perry 1

Sid Slatten 2

 

2-22-18

Balko Local Livestock Show

Held Saturday Feb. 3, 2018

The Balko Livestock Show was held on Saturday February 3, 2018, in the Agriculture arena. There were four species of animals there: Cattle, Sheep, Goats, and Pigs.

In the Cattle division, Grand Champion Heifer went to Kelby Sager, and Reserve Champion went to Halle Littau. The Grand Champion Prospect Steer went to Gavin Sager, and Reserve Champion went to Kodie Fleming. The Grand Champion Market Steer went to Kendal Frantz and the Reserve Champion went to Adam Creason. In the Showmanship round, the Junior Showman was Kodie Fleming and the Senior Showman was Adam Creason.

In the Sheep division, the Grand Champion and the Reserve Champion Ewe went to Paige Halpain. The Grand Champion and the Reserve Champion Wether went to Danny Nelson. In the Showmanship round, the Junior Showman was Simon Nelson, and the Senior Showman was Danny Nelson.

In the Goat division, the Grand Champion Doe went to Kodie Fleming, and the Reserve Champion went to Rebbecca Freeman. The Grand Champion and Reserve Champion Wether went to Kodie Fleming. In the Showmanship round, the Junior Showman went to Kodie Fleming.

In the Pig division, the Grand Champion Gilt went to Aspen Freeman, and Reserve Champion went to Jasmyn Mesa. The Grand Champion Market Barrow went to Jasmyn Mesa and the Reserve Champion went to Nathan Cook. In the Showmanship round, the Junior Showman was Aspen Freeman, and Senior Showman was Nathan Cook.

Written by the Balko FFA Reporter, Britney Woodbury.

15 Beaver exhibitors, 30 Hogs, 4 Beef, 4 sheep and 2 Goats

                    Participated in the Beaver Local Show Saturday, Feb 10.

The Beaver Local Stock show was held Saturday, February 10, 2018 at the Beaver County Fairgrounds.

15 Beaver FFA and 4-H exhibitors participated in the cold temperatures inside and out.

4 beef, 4 sheep, two goats and 30 hogs were exhibited.

Goats: Katelyn Estrada had the Grand Champion goat, Reserve Grand Champion goat and Champion Showman.

Ewe: Avery Harrison had the Grand Champion Ewe and Angela Pell had the Reserve Grand Champion Ewe and Avery Harrison had the Champion Showman.

Cattle: Sid Slatten had the Champion Angus, Hereford, Maine and Simmental calf, and Grand Champion, Reserve Grand and Showman beef.

Gilts: Sid Slatten had the Champion Hamp, Champion Cross while Carson Slatten had the Reserve.

Both received the Grand Champion and Reserve Grand Champion prize.

Barrows:

Beck: Landri Bennett Champion and Dalton Perry Reserve.

Duroc; Camdyn Bennet, Champion.

Hamp:

Class 1. Preslee Bennett 1st and Jess Brown, 2nd.

Class 2 Avery Harrison 1st and Reese Porter 2nd.

Class 3. Ethan Frantz, 1st, and Champion; Hadley Cates 2nd and Reserve and Devyn Porter 3rd.

Spot. Camdyn Bennett 1st and Champion and Devyn Porter 2nd and Reserve.

York: Skylar Perry 1st and Champion.

Cross:

Class 1. Jess Brown 1st Hadley Cates 2nd and Ethan Frantz, 3rd.

Class 2.

Landri Bennett 1st, Preslee Bennett, 2nd, Skyler Perry, 3rd, Dalton Perry, 4th and Chris Mills 5th.

Class 3; Landri Bennett, 1st and Champion. Preslee Bennett 2nd and Reserve. Camdyn Bennett 3rd and Ethan Frantz 4h.

Grand Champion Landri Bennett and Reserve Preslee Bennett.

Camdyn Bennettt was the Jr Swine Showman and Landri Bennett was the Sr. Swine Showman.

 

2-15-18

Beaver County Health Department Offering Flu Shots at No Cost

As the flu season brings record-breaking numbers of hospitalizations and deaths across the state, the Beaver County Health Department is offering flu shots at no cost to recipients.

Reports from the Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) indicate 3,440 flu-associated hospitalizations, and 153 deaths statewide since the season began in September. These numbers surpass any other flu season since the OSDH began tracking in 2009.

Public health officials remind the public that there are several weeks remaining in the flu season, and the number of hospitalizations and deaths will continue to increase. A flu shot is encouraged for anyone over the age of 6 months who hasn’t been immunized. It is especially recommended for those over the age of 65, those who suffer from chronic heart and lung conditions, and pregnant women.

“It is not too late to get a flu shot,” said Terri Salisbury, regional director. “It takes up to two weeks for the vaccine to be fully effective. Flu season runs through May, so it is important to have protection as soon as possible.”

The Beaver County Health Department has high-dose vaccine for senior citizens that may not be available from health care providers. The vaccine must by administered by the end of May.

In addition to getting a flu shot, it is important to practice frequent hand washing and prevent the spread of germs by covering your sneeze and cough. Those who are having flu-like symptoms such as fever, body aches, fatigue and chills are encouraged to stay home from public gatherings until they are able to go 24 hours without a fever, and without fever-reducing medication.

Anyone interested in receiving a flu shot at no cost should contact the Beaver county health department at 580-625-3693 for clinic times and further information. The clinic is located on Highway 270 South in Beaver.

2-15-18

Total votes for Special election

CASEY MURDOCK (REP) 6,184 67.97%

AMBER JENSEN (DEM) 2,914 32.03%

Beaver county vote

CASEY MURDOCK (REP) 673 71.60%

AMBER JENSEN (DEM) 267 28.40%

 

FOR OFFICE NO. 3 BEAVER PUBLIC SCHOOl
CHUCK MADSEN 66 17.10%

KERRY STAFFORD 182 47.15%

BROCK D. RUSSELL 138 35.75%


BEAVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 022

PROPOSITION NO. 1

BEAVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS ELECTION

TOTAL FOR THE PROPOSITION - YES 268 68.89%

AGAINST THE PROPOSITION - NO 121 31.11%
BEAVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 022

PROPOSITION NO. 2 BEAVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

TOTAL FOR THE PROPOSITION - YES 286 73.90%

AGAINST THE PROPOSITION - NO 101 26.10%

TURPIN PUBLIC SCHOOLS INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 128

FOR OFFICE NO. 3 TURPIN PUBLIC SCHOOLS

JOHN MOSES 143 59.34%

SALLY HULING 98 40.66%

2-15-18

January 2018

Beaver fifth graders networking with postcards

Fifth graders at Beaver Elementary School in Oklahoma are networking in a big way: through the power of postcards. At the beginning of the school year, students were challenged by their teacher, California transplant, Courtney Ridens, to engage in a postcard exchange that would connect them with students in schools across all 50 states. The challenge, created by fellow Bay Area teacher, Erin Levy, was originally established as a project for her own students to send and receive postcards from all 50 states - whether from friends, family, or distant connections.

However, thanks to the power of social media, the postcard exchange has evolved into a behemoth of a collaborative effort, with participants from nearly 400 schools on an international scale engaging one another through facts about their towns, states, and countries. It has become a positive and creative way for teachers to work with students in a differentiated setting: blending their writing, research, and history skills, while engaging in a project that will be shown off to a grander audience than the eyes of their own peers.

When Ms. Ridens signed up Beaver’s fifth grade classes in August, the group was registered to the fourth of 11 potential postcard groups, ultimately receiving signups from 56 schools across 44 states in their section, and one additional signup from a school in Morocco. There are few requirements for the project, other than the importance of correctly labeling postcards. Students are reminded to ensure their names, schools, and pertinent information are included in the letter. Of the 56 schools, Beaver’s fifth graders have so far received postcards from 21 schools from every region of the United States.

In order to create an effective letter, students spent time reading postcards as they came in, making notes about each: what grabbed their interest, what they wished was included, and what they would like to make sure was embedded in our class’s letter. Ms. Ridens often lead the whole class in brainstorming sessions, gleaning what they felt was absolutely necessary to include in their cards to other schools. Students wanted to share Beaver’s population, local hotspots, and the unique weather patterns throughout the state. They also wanted to help people understand what it means to say they live in the "panhandle," after Ms. Ridens told them stories of people in California not recognizing the state, itself, looks like a pan.

Through their collaborative efforts, students orally dictated a letter, and Ms. Ridens typed their exact phrasing onto the classroom’s SmartBoard, so students were able to visually see the letter come together. Through this, students were able to revise, scrap, and restructure the letter as they saw fit. Students were then given blank postcards and one requirement from their teacher: design how they chose, but keep it relevant to the town of Beaver, the state of Oklahoma, or both. Thankfully, Beaver School District has provided the classroom with 1:1 technology, meaning each student has their own Chromebook to work with during the school day. With this fortunate opportunity, students were able to research additional facts about Oklahoma and the town of Beaver to include on their cards while finding images that would be appropriate for their larger audience.

In one fell swoop, students cut, glued, signed, and addressed their uniquely decorated postcards to be sent around the country. Sharing their excitement to receive postcards from other schools, students were equally exuberant about sending cards that they know would take a grand journey through the mail, reaching students at other schools. Through the power of a button on social media, students were able to engage in a fun challenge that allowed them to connect with others in a now old-fashioned manner: through the power of a stamp

 

 

Edmondson says legislature should be subject to sunshine laws

Transparency a start to restoring faith in government

 

OKLAHOMA CITY, March 12, 2018 – Secret meetings and backroom deals are the everyday norm at our state capitol. That is why gubernatorial candidate Drew Edmondson today is calling on Oklahoma’s legislature to fully subject its actions to public scrutiny.

The legislature has exempted itself from the Open Meetings Act and Open Records Act, but Edmondson believes the Oklahoma House of Representatives and Oklahoma Senate should be held to the same standards as other public bodies in Oklahoma.

“Government belongs to the people,” Edmondson said. “Every meeting they hold, every document they create – those things do not belong to the legislature, they belong to the people. The legislature should conduct its business in the open, for all to see. Instead, the deals are done and then spoils are distributed in private. What we see in committee hearings and on the floor of the house and senate is simply ceremony.”

A recipient of Freedom of Information Oklahoma’s Marian Opala First Amendment Award, Edmondson has long been recognized as a champion of open government. 

“Legislators should know that their constituents are tired of closed-door meetings where corporate CEOs and high-paid lobbyists have seats at the table but everyday Oklahomans are kept in the dark,” Edmondson said. “We can begin to restore trust in Oklahoma government if our elected officials would only let the light shine in.”

Edmondson has pledged as governor to create an Office of Open Government with the sole purpose of ensuring compliance with state and federal sunshine laws.

“Good government dies in the dark,” Edmondson said. “Government agencies should follow the letter of the law but also the spirit of the law. Oklahoma’s openness laws were crafted to ensure that governmental agencies would be responsive to the people they serve. The intent of the laws is that the public be informed. From city hall to the state capitol, government agencies and public officials should stand on the side of openness.”

As attorney general, Edmondson frequently forced government agencies to be more transparent, including issuing an Opinion that declared government email records were public documents available for inspection, filling a gap in public access to electronic communications. Edmondson also created and taught a statewide, multiyear series of educational seminars designed to inform local, county and state officials, as well as the general public, about the requirements of Oklahoma’s sunshine laws.

“Open government is necessary for good government,” Edmondson said. “Our legislators  should not hide from us. The decisions they make and the laws they create impact every Oklahoman. We are their constituents and we have the right to hold them accountable for their actions. Legislative leaders should move out of the shadows and into the light.”  

A Navy veteran who served our country in Vietnam, Edmondson’s first job upon leaving the military was teaching speech and debate at his alma mater, Muskogee Central High School. Edmondson is a graduate of Northeastern State College and the University of Tulsa School of Law. He is a former district attorney and served four terms as Oklahoma’s attorney general. Learn more at www.drewforoklahoma.com.

 

 

Veterans Day display at Jones and Plummer Trail Museum

Open to the public now

 

Sept 30, 2017

Best of show at Quilt show at Beaver

 

Friendship quilt at Beaver Quilt show Sept. 30, 2017

My Aunt Mabel Boren finished it

Linda Belcher left and Cheley McAlister right

 

 

10-19-17

The Beaver County Health Department announced seasonal influenza vaccination clinic schedule for the upcoming flu season.

Flu shots will be given October 23rd by appointment only. To schedule an appointment, please call the Beaver County Health Department at 625-3693 to schedule your appointment.

The Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) and Beaver County Health Department recommend flu vaccination each year for everyone 6 months of age and older. The more people vaccinated, the less the chance that flu will spread in families and communities.

Each year in the United States, flu causes millions of illnesses, hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations and thousands of deaths. The flu vaccine is the best defense against getting the flu. Flu season usually starts in September or October and runs through April or May.

"It takes about two weeks after vaccination to become fully protected so it is important for everyone in your family to be vaccinated as soon as possible," said Terri Salisbury, administrative director for the Beaver County Health Department. "Protection from the flu vaccine lasts about six months, so people vaccinated in October should be protected through April of next year."

Immunization is the safest and best way to protect people at high risk from the flu such as pregnant women, children and people with chronic heart and lung diseases. In addition to getting a flu vaccination, people 65 and older, and those with chronic health conditions, should ask their doctor about being vaccinated against pneumococcal pneumonia. Pneumococcal pneumonia is a common and potentially serious complication of the flu. Unlike the influenza vaccine, the pneumococcal vaccine does not need to be given every year.

he Beaver County Health Department will be providing flu vaccine using the following fee schedule:

·All individuals with health insurance should bring their card. Their insurance company will be billed for the vaccine and an administration fee.

·Individuals who have no health insurance, whose health insurance does not cover flu vaccine, who are eligible for SoonerCare, or children 18 years of age and younger who are Native American or Alaskan natives may receive their vaccine at no charge.

·All others will be charged a fee of $25 to cover the cost of the flu vaccine and the cost of administering the vaccine.

Again, Flu shots will be given October 23rd by appointment only. To schedule an appointment, please contact the health department at 625-3693.

The Beaver County Health Department will accept SoonerCare, Medicare, all private health insurance, cash, checks, or credit cards as payment for flu vaccine.

 

 

 

Beaver