Beaver News

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Beaver News

August 2015

Evans family had 70th reunion

Family members of William Pritchard (W.P.) and Ann (Foulkes) Evans went for a change of venue this year and held their 70th reunion in Woodward, Oklahoma at the Northwest Electric Cooperative Bldg.

The meeting change was meant to attract more families. Attendance of 22 was encouraging since several family members that are normally there, were absent due to health and other issues. Secretary, Debbie (Rock) Willeford chaired the business part of the reunion in the absence of president Todd Yeomans and vice president Andy OíReilly. Debbie shared correspondence and thank you notes from the family of Jim Maynard as well as the family of Vera Evans.

It has been the tradition of late to give Gideon Bibles for funeral tributes in lieu of flowers. We were sorry to lose these members this past year. Debbie reported that Bonita Campbell has volunteered to make a quilt containing names of family members to be sold to the highest bidder at our white elephant auction. Blocks will be sent to members to sign and return to Bonita. Hopefully this will be very successful. Keep in touch with Debbie via email or phone if you do not receive a block. You are going to want your family name on that quilt! This quilt will be similar to the beautiful quilt of the original twelve children that Marilyn Christorpherson Jackson has given to Debbie to share with the family at the reunions.

Loni OíReilly suggested more than one quilt be made. There are still a few more of the Evans history books available that were written by Dorothy Gray Gaona for price of $20, or if youíd like it mailed to you the cost is $25. This money will be taken to Dorothy. Call or email Debbie if you would like one. As always a little competition is good for the soul.

One goal sought after is who has the most family members present. This year would show a tie! Congratulations to the families of Winnie and Logan Rock and Everett and Minta Evans for each having the same amount of members present. Mary Nell Speaks got the award for traveling the farthest to attend the reunion, as well as the award for being oldest female family member present. She was also wished a happy 83rd birthday for her upcoming August 4th birthday. Congratulations Mary Nell! The oldest male in attendance was Will Stemen. A mere 75 years young.

On the other end of the spectrum, the youngest members present were brother and sister. Mason Tyler Mclemore came in at a whopping 3 years of age, while baby sister Skye Raeleigh Mclemore won at the wee age of just shy of 4 weeks. They are the children of Kara and Zach Mclemore, grandchildren of Brenda Evans, and great-grands of Debbie and Lloyd Evans. Another young lady, 15 months old, received a prize for being in attendance, that was Arrabella Grace, daughter of Rocky and Kala Taylor and granddaughter of Deitra Rock Rhoads, and great-grands of Dean and Helen Rock.

Door prizes were given out to Cheryl Carley and Donna Wunderly. Debbie Evans won the prize for managing to figure out the closest number of buttons in a beautiful violin-shaped jar. As a token of thanks for attending the reunion, each family present was given a small gift from Debbie and Clifton Willeford from one of their trips traveled. The officerís elected last year were again nominated and voted unanimously to fill the offices next year since they were unable to attend this year. The President will be Todd Yeomans, Vice President will be Andy OíReilly, Sec/Trea will be Debbie Rock Willeford, Reporter will be Elaine Evans Clapper and Clifton Willeford will remain auctioneer for the auction.

The White Elephant Auction was continued this year and people had lots of fun. Clifton Willeford, auctioneer, always provides lots of entertainment. He never fails to keep the mood up and get those bids going.

The total raised at this years auction, donations and guessing game was $159. Folks really enjoyed sharing the day with each other, so much that they decided to have the reunion next year at the same location. And itís always the first Saturday in August. Mark you calendars now for Saturday, August 6

Head on over to Woodward, OK. We will be happy to see one and all at the Northwest Electric Cooperative building. Debbie Evans will reserve the building for us again and everyone thanked her for her part in getting it reserved this year. It was voted unanimously to do a pot luck again. Paper products, drinks, ice, door prizes and gifts will be provided by funds collected through the auction each year.

Family members in attendance were: Will & Kara Stemen, Cindy Wise, Annette Mund, and Cherly Carley, Bethany, OK; Leilani OíReilly, Beaver, OK; Debbie and Lloyd Evans, Laverne, OK; Brenda Evans, Forgan, OK; Kara Mclemore, Mason and Sky, Beaver, OK; Mary Nell Speaks, Donna Wunderly, Fredonia, KS; Dee Dee Rock Rhoads, Blackwell, OK; Rocky Taylor, Kala and Bella, Seiling, OK; Ken and Ralyssa Taylor, Alva, OK; Clifton & Debbie Willeford, Perryton, TX. Hope to see you next year at the 71st Evans Reunion.

 

Sprague family had annual reunion Aug. 16

Several branches and a few twigs of the Mary Ellen Plain Sprague family met Sunday, August 16 in the Cimarron Room of First Security Bank for their annual reunion.

Mary Ellen Toles was born August 22, 1853 in Newbury, Ontario, Canada. She married William James Plain September 18, 1873. Ten children were born to this union. William James died September 22, 1890. Mary Ellen married Levi Sprague on June 9, 1906.

The first reunion was at Clear Creek in 1943 to celebrate Mary Ellenís 90th birthday. Descendants have met every year since on the third Sunday of August to commemorate Grandma Spragueís birthday.

Two first generation grandchildren attended this year: Glendena Blosser (widow of Woodrow Blosser) Woodward, OK; and Bethene Blosser (widow of Charles Blosser) Little Rock, AR.

Great grandchildren of Mary Ellen attending were: Donald Morris, Coffeyville, KS; Thelma (Woodson) Long, Granby, MO; Coeta (Plain) Sperry Halliburton (and husband, Raymond) Follett, TX; Randy Blosser, Douglas, OK; Glenda Blosser, Woodward, OK; Carl Blosser, Farley/Gladstone, NM; Wendell Ferguson, Perryton, TX; Barbara (Longcor) Hager (and husband, Jerry), Ford, KS; Susan (Blosser) Hughes, Bristow, OK; Bill Jamison (and wife, April), Beaver, OK; Bob Woodson (and wife, Sharon), Laverne, OK; Garry Blosser (and wife, Estella), Oklahoma City, OK; Diane Glenn, Hays, KS; Leora (Woodson) Bridgewater (and husband, Herb) Beaver.

Great-great grandchildren present were: Kristi Morris, Independence, KS; Steven Paris (and wife, Janet; sons, Jace and Lane), Liberal, KS; Sam Woodson, Woodward; Anesia (Ferguson) Shores, Goodwell, OK; Zach Hughes (and children, Hallie and Max), Bristow; Cheyenne (Hughes) Dunbar (and husband), John; Kurt Long, Laverne; Melissa Smith (and children, Zoey and Haven), Guymon. Other guests: Virginia Morris-Evans, Caney, KS; Marci, Bristow, OK.

Evidently Grandma Sprague passed on her cooking ability because the pot-luck meal was fabulous and enjoyed by all. Pictures, stories, reminiscences and no doubt a tall tale or two, completed the afternoon.

Those who attend every year were pleased to welcome some relatives that had not been there for twenty-five years or more.


News

9-10-15

New group being formed to help others

There is a new group forming in Beaver called "Hearts with Hands". The purpose of the group is to help support individuals in the Beaver area who are in need to financial support to receive treatment for life threatening issues or are in need to a better quality of life but are in need of help to achieve that goal.

It is not just a charity, but a group effort that includes the participation of the person who is being helped. Whether the beneficiary particulates with some kind of physical involvement or financial contribution, as the group works together they become a "support family".

The first person who is being helped is Sheridan Rutherford. Although she has changed her diet and works two jobs seven days a week, she has not been able to lose the weight she needs to be out of danger from all the health risks that accompany obesity. She is in need of a sleeve or by-pass procedure in order to change her circumstances. Sheridan lives in Beaver with her son and would love to be active and feeling good.

The group will begin a fund raising campaign beginning with a raffle of several items that will be on display at the County Fair this September. Large items include a Ruger Rifle, tickets to a Thunder Game, 2 YETI coolers and coin sets. Several smaller items range from beauty baskets to art. We would encourage you to stop by our booth at the fair and buy some tickets for your chance to win one of these great prizes.

More fund raisers are planned for future dates and we will keep you informed of those events. All proceeds will be kept in a fund and any extra monies will be kept for the next recipient. If you would like to be a part of this effort or have questions, contact Mike Blackard at 580-527-1813 or stop by our booth at the Fair, September 11 and 12.

 

Library receives big grant

The Beaver County Pioneer Library is one of eleven programs statewide awarded a $4,000 health literacy grant from the Oklahoma Department of Libraries (ODL). The goal for awarded projects is to provide resources and training that enhance community awareness about health and wellness.

The local grant will address several health and wellness issues. The library will have four programs that will provide information on healthy eating, exercise, cooking and growing vegetables.

"We are excited to collaborate with other organizations to carry out this effort," Librarian assistant Joyce Skelton said. Our partners include: Liz McBee - OSU Extension Office, Carolyn Venable - Nutritionst and Abby Robagh - Yoga Instructor. "Together we hope to make a difference in the lives of our fellow citizens by encouraging healthier choices and improving access to health information."

Americaís Health Rankings, annual report by the United Health Foundation, lists Oklahoma near the bottom according to Leslie Gelders, director of ODLís Literacy Resource Office. "We rank 46th out of the 50 states," Gelders said. "Among the health concerns reported, our state ranks poorly in such areas as immunization of children, obesity, diabetes, drug deaths, high cholesterol, annual dental visits, and consumption of fruits."

Along with the many reported health concerns, Gelders said there are also concerns when it comes to the ability of many Oklahoma adults to access, read, and understand credible health and wellness information.

"The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention reports that almost nine out of ten Americans have problems reading and using consumer health information," Gelders said. "If the majority of Americans have problems understanding health information, imagine the obstacles faced by people with low reading skills or a limited understanding of English."

Gelders said studies reveal that an individualís ability to read and understand health information is actually a stronger predictor of a personís health than his age, socioeconomic status, education or ethnicity.

"In order to improve the stateís health outcomes, Oklahomans need to be able to access and understand reliable health information," Joyce Skelton said. "We also need to be able to speak effectively with our medical professionals, follow dosage instructions, and use available resources to make informed health decisions for ourselves and our families."

Gelders said health literacy partnerships are a relatively new concept for Oklahoma library and literacy programs.

"The better understanding individuals have about their health choices, the better the outcomes. Thatís why this project is so important, and thatís why the Federal Institute of Museum and Library Services is providing the funding for these grants."

For information on Oklahomaís adult literacy efforts, visit www.odl.state.ok.us/literacy.

To learn more about the local effort, contact Beaver County Pioneer Library 580-625-3076.

 

7-9-15
 

Beaver Elementaryís top

readers from 2014-15 are

recognized by Mrs. Kemp

By Angie Kemp

Beaver Schools

I am very pleased to recognize the top AR readers for the 2014-2015 school year. This group represents the 4th-6th graders at Beaver Elementary School. They are: #1 Addyson Noyes 589.2 pts, #2 Patrick Humby 568.3 pts, #3 Brooklyn Rigdon 508.3 pts, #4 Triston Akridge 417 pts, #5 Dalton Perry 409.6 pts, #6 Hailey Facio 357 pts, #7 Zoee Weaver 355.1 pts, #8 Jillian Standley 325.1 pts, #9 Devyn Porter 305.3 pts, #10 Willie Norton 289.4 pts.

These students have gone above what was expected of them and have placed a high priority on reading. Good readers most usually make good students who are successful in other areas of academics. I applaud them for their hard work. I also encourage each to keep on reading. Another group of students I would like to recognize is the top 10 readers by percentage.

Each of these students has collectively averaged at least 94.5 percent on all of the AR tests he/she took during the 2014-2015 school year. They are: #1 Dalton Perry 98.4%, #2 Addyson Noyes 97.8%, #3 Jaydon Mills 97.6%, #4 Sydnee Looper 97.4%, #5 Solana Niles 97.3%, #6 Robert Lee 97%, #7 Devyn Porter 96.7%, #8 Joshua Levick 96.2%, #9 Yahir Rivera 95.8%, #10 Brooklyn Rigdon 95.5%.

I would also like to recognize three students for honorable mention. They are Acacia Hoover, Misael Chavez, and Jarrett Short. All three earned a 94.5% average on their AR tests this year. In addition to recognizing these students, I would also like to thank their teachers for encouraging them to become better readers as well as their parents for making reading a priority in their homes.

Unfortunately summer is already over. If you have not already had your children reading at least 20 minutes per day, now is the time to start. That is one way to avoid regressing on some of the reading skills that students could lose over the summer when they are not practicing their reading skills daily. I would highly recommend visiting our Beaver County Library which has a wonderful selection of books for younger readers as well as older students.

Gunnar Lansden won the Home Run Derby. He knocked 7 balls out. Sherry Jenkins of Rainbow Connection gave Gunnar a $100 check.

March 19, 2015

Beaver youth receives special bike

In the latter part of 2014, Beaverís Bryce Rose received a new AmTryke (a therapeutic tricycle) from the Woodward Mid-Day AMBUCS Club.

The AmTryke was equipped to help with the necessary attachments to help Bryce with his difficulties with some movements.

AMBUCS is a national civic organization composed of men and women dedicated to creating mobility and independence to people with disabilities.

Rose has Downs Symdrome and Dystonia, which is a neurogoigcal condition that causes involuntary movements and postures. The young man cannot talk but is expressive in other ways, according to his grandparents - C.J. and Janice Rose.

"This bike has a special rear steering and brake control," said Leona Reeg of the Mid-Day AMBUCS Club. "The rear brakes and steering control helps the parents or anyone who has him on the Tryke to help him steer and brake from behind if he should need help."

The Roses are the furthest family the Woodward club has been able to help with a Tryke, Reeg said.

"We learned of the Roses from our Norman club who contacted us told us about Bryce and what he needed," Reeg noted. "We are glad they contacted us so we could do this for him."The club has already given eight AmTrykes and 60 backpacks away as of the end of the year.

 

From Jim Rice Seward County Commissioner

The following came from Jim Rice who is one of the Commissioners of Seward County.

One ought to read the fine print these days.

A thousand years is a long time. Todayís landowners are making decisions that will affect people on that land for the next 40 generations. Thatís something to take pretty seriously, said Harriet Hageman, a Wyoming water and natural resource attorney. A conservation easement, sometimes granted as "perpetual," which legally means 999 years, is a tool for guaranteeing the future use of a piece of property. It can also be an avenue for federal government agencies to gain control over private property. Hageman provided a critical analysis of easements to landowners during her presentation at the South Dakota, Wyoming joint Farm Bureau Young Farmer and Rancher Conference in Deadwood, South Dakota on Jan. 17.

"Conservation easements are consolidating control over real properties through legally binding contracts. As the property owner, or grantor, you retain partial ownership rights to the land, but you are also relinquishing rights of control and decision-making over future use and development of the property," Hageman said.

In 1950 there were 53 land trusts involved in purchasing conservation easements. By 2005 that number had jumped to 1,668. In 2010, the National Land Trust Census listed 47 million acres under conservation easements through approximately 1,700 land trusts. Many of the largest land trusts are controlled by environmental organizations such as The Nature Conservancy (TNC), Ducks Unlimited, American Farmland Trust and The Conservation Fund.

A thousand years is a long time. Todayís landowners are making decisions that will affect people on that land for the next 40 generations. Thatís something to take pretty seriously, said Harriet Hageman, a Wyoming water and natural resource attorney. A conservation easement, sometimes granted as "perpetual," which legally means 999 years, is a tool for guaranteeing the future use of a piece of property. It can also be an avenue for federal government agencies to gain control over private property. Hageman provided a critical analysis of easements to landowners during her presentation at the South Dakota, Wyoming joint Farm Bureau Young Farmer and Rancher Conference in Deadwood, South Dakota on Jan. 17.

"Conservation easements are consolidating control over real properties through legally binding contracts. As the property owner, or grantor, you retain partial ownership rights to the land, but you are also relinquishing rights of control and decision-making over future use and development of the property," Hageman said.

In 1950 there were 53 land trusts involved in purchasing conservation easements. By 2005 that number had jumped to 1,668. In 2010, the National Land Trust Census listed 47 million acres under conservation easements through approximately 1,700 land trusts. Many of the largest land trusts are controlled by environmental organizations such as The Nature Conservancy (TNC), Ducks Unlimited, American Farmland Trust and The Conservation Fund.

"That is a 731 percent increase in conservation easement acres in Wyoming alone," said Hageman. "More than 10 million total acres were placed in land trusts from 2005 to 2010, and the majority of those acres were in the western U.S., with particular focus on states with less previously controlled federal and state lands, such as Kansas, South Dakota and North Dakota."

"What concerns me is that we are federalizing our private property rights. We are allowing government agencies and non-profits to make decisions regarding land use, and to take our rights away through tolerating perpetual conservation easements." Wyoming water and natural resource attorney Harriet Hageman regarding one of her primary concerns with perpetual conservation easements being placed on private lands in the west. Photo by Heather Hamilton-Maude

One example of a Nature Conservancy conservation easement at work is in the Sandhills of Nebraska, where the Horse Creek Fen Ranch was purchased by the group in 1977.

"It is more than 3,000 acres and has some very important habitat for rare plants and wildlife. We wanted to protect the fen so we acquired the property, explained Conservancy spokesman Chris Anderson.

The Conservancy also recognized the struggle young people have in purchasing a ranching operation, and as a result started a beginning ranching program to look for a family willing to manage the ranch, and potentially own it someday.

"We found a young couple, and they signed a five- year lease agreement with us. They had the option to buy the ranch in 2005 at its appraised value, minus the price of a conservation easement that protects the fen. The couple was able to purchase the property and they continue to own and operate it as a working ranch,"" said Anderson.

He noted that in this instance, the Conservancy helped a young ranching family get started in the agriculture business and protected one of the key natural features of the property with an easement.

 

Alex Pettitt of Meeker received a $5,000 from the Sparks foundation. He is a senior at Meeker and the son of Larry and Lisa Pettitt and grandson of Joe and Darlene Lansden of Beaver

January 2015


Darlene Lansden was sworn into office as Beaver County Assessor by District Judge Jon Parsley Monday morning January 5, 2015


Brad Raven was sworn into office as Beaver County Commissioner District No. 3 by District Judge Jon Parsley Monday morning January 5, 2015. Frank King was sworn into office Tuesday, January 6, 2015 by Judge Reddick.

March 19, 2015

Producers reminded of NAP deadline

Beaver County Farm Service Agency (FSA) urges producers who want to purchase coverage through the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) to do so before the sales closing date of March 15, 2015.

NAP provides financial assistance to producers of noninsurable crops when low yields/grazing loss, loss of inventory or prevented planting occur due to natural disasters including drought, freeze, hail, excessive moisture, excessive wind or hurricanes.

In order to meet eligibility requirements for NAP, crops must be noninsurable, commercially-produced agricultural commodity crops for which the catastrophic risk protection level of crop insurance is not available.

FSA policy has changed - for the 2015 crop year, producers in Kansas, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota and Texas who annually plant crops used for mechanically harvested livestock feed, can purchase both NAP coverage at the catastrophic level or higher ("buy-up") and Rainfall Index Ė Annual Forage Insurance plan coverage offered through Risk Management Agency (RMA); however if a NAP payment and indemnity benefit are payable, the producer must choose. The producer cannot receive benefits under both.

The Agricultural Act of 2014 (the 2014 Farm Bill) allows producers to choose higher levels of NAP coverage. Previously, the program offered coverage at 55 percent of the average market price for crop losses that exceed 50 percent of expected production. Producers can now choose higher levels of coverage, up to 65 percent of their expected production at 100 percent of the average market price. It is important to note that the higher coverage is not available on grazing crops.

The following crops in Beaver County have a NAP application closing date of March 15, 2015: Grass Ė warm season grazing Ė Native & Old World Bluestem, Sorghum Forage (Feed) grazing or haying, and various other "Summer Planted Crops".

Eligible producers must file the application and pay a service fee by the March 15, 2015 deadline. Producers also pay a fixed premium for higher coverage. Beginning, limited resource and underserved producers may request a waiver of the service fee and a 50 percent premium reduction when the application for coverage is filed.

March 12, 2105

Three Beaver County hoop teams in Area final

Dusters reach Area final for first time since 2006

With the 2015 basketball playoff chase reaching its pinnacle - one week away from the start of the State Tournament - three Beaver County schools remain alive in the chase for gold.

The Beaver Dusters are in the Area final for the first time since 2006 and will face Pond Creek-Hunter Friday night in Enid at 8 p.m.; the Forgan Bulldogs won their seventh straight Regional crown last week and will face Southwest Covenant Friday in Woodward at 8 - and the Forgan Lady Bulldogs are in the Area final and will play Coyle Friday night at 6:30 also in Woodward.

The Dusters (19-7) defeated Arapaho-Butler Saturday night 43-37 - despite trailing by five entering the fourth quarter.

"Most of these playoff games are going to be close," BHS coach Craig Schlessman said. "As we go down the stretch, there is nobody that we are going to just knockout - but there is no one who will just destroy us.

"We have to let the game evolve and evolve with it. If you canít, you donít win. I tell the boys that all of these games are tough and we have to change as the game changes. We have to be patient and as the game continues the fundamentals of basketball will come back out. And I think we are as fundamental as anybody. The last three games have panned out for us."

Schlessmanís crew will face a solid PC-Hunter team that will be playing basically in its own back yard.

"We are about to go against a team that might be more fundamentally sound than we are," Schlessman said. "It is going to be a tough one. They are not a pushover or slouch. I think our size is going to hinder them quite a bit. Their shooting can be deadly from the outside. We are definitely going to have to play good defense."

The defending state champion Bulldogs are 21-5 and have had a bit of a roller coaster season under coach Todd Kerr. However, they are back in the hunt for a "win and in" scenario against Southwest Covenant.

"We are fortunate to have had the opportunity to be there that many times in a row," Kerr said. "We are blessed to continue to get this chance. Because of some of our deficiencies, we have not looked forward at all. Hopefully, Friday night we can have a chance to go compete and win."

SW Convenant, despite a sub .500 record, is a tough match, Kerr said.

"They have some size and one player who can score from anywhere," Kerr said. "I think our schedule has prepared us for this. I think it is a game that we can definitely compete in."

The Forgan girls, meanwhile, have not dropped a game to a Class B team all season and sit as one of the favorites to win the gold ball. FHS (25-1) will face an athletic Coyle team that defeated Leedey by just four in the Regional final. The Lady Bulldogs thumped Leedey in the finals of the Oil Center Classic in January.

"They are definitely athletic," Lady Bulldog coach Brett Trippet said. "We will have our work cut out for us, no doubt. But, this group has played so well together this season."

 

 

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